Kā hua o te Kahuru Whai Rawa – celebrating 10 years of success! It’s the Whai Rawa 10-year anniversary and if you’re a Whai Rawa member*, you’re in the prize draw to win some cool prizes. 10 yr poster wh rawa red 13-14 - TPR - FINAL

Whai Rawa has grown considerably in the 10 years of operation, with the first member admitted back in September 2006 and now has more than 22,000 members. Together our members have more than $53M in the fund. To-date more than 2,000 members have collectively used more than $5M in Whai Rawa savings to access tertiary education, home ownership and greater comfort in retirement.

As a Whai Rawa member, you are already in the draw to win some great prizes.

Click on the picture to find out more about the prizes.

Between July and September 2016 Whai Rawa will draw prizes for:

–  10 x $100 Whai Rawa cash vouchers (to be deposited into a Whai Rawa account of your choice)

–  5  x iPad mini’s

– 2 x Pounamu (to the value of $250 each)

–  A whānau weekend in Queenstown, including NZ-based internal flights, accommodation, rental car, dinner voucher and whānau pass to Ngāi Tahu Tourism’s Shotover Jet (2 x adults and up to 2 x tamariki)

– A whānau weekend in Rotorua, including NZ-based internal flights, accommodation, rental car, dinner voucher and whānau pass to Ngāi Tahu Tourism’s Rainbow Springs and the Agrodome (2 x adults and up to 2 x tamariki)

 

All Whai Rawa members* are automatically in the draw to win! Stay tuned to TahuFM or follow Whai Rawa on Facebook to find out more about the prize draw.

*’Whai Rawa 10th birthday prize draw terms and conditions‘.

The year ending 31 March 2016 has been another great year for Whai Rawa.

Highlights for the year included the growth in total member funds from $44m to $52m and a return of 5.24% (before PIE tax).

Please check your fund’s progress recorded in the statements, including the individual reports from the Whai Rawa Chair, Kristen Kohere-Soutar and Te Rūnanga Kaiwhakahaere, Tā Mark Solomon.

The 2016 Whai Rawa annual report  also highlights Whai Rawa Board Director profiles.

Click on the link above or contact us for a hard copy.

The year ending 31 March 2015 has been another great year for Whai Rawa. 

Highlights for the year included the growth in total member funds from $35m to $44m, a return of 9.48% (before PIE tax).

Please take time to read the individual reports from the incoming Whai Rawa Chair, Kristen Kohere-Soutar, our outgoing Chair Diana Crossan and Te Rūnanga Kaiwhakahaere, Tā Mark Solomon.

The annual report also tells the stories of some Whai Rawa members and their Whai Rawa savings successes .  These profiles and more can also be found on our website,  whānau stories page.

Click on the cover picture to check out the annual report now or contact us for a hard copy.

Kia ora Whai Rawa members

You may be aware that some members have received a Whai Rawa statement in electronic format – via an email. Please note that if we have an email address for you, you would have been sent a secure link to the statement to view it or download it it electronically. If you want a paper copy of of your statement and don’t have access to a printer, we can print one off and post it to you.

Just click this link to complete a form and order a copy.

If you’re joining up yourself, your tamariki or mokopuna with Whai Rawa while you’re at Te Matatini we’ll enter you in the draw to win a brand new Huawei Ideos X3 Smartphone – it comes with Te Reo Māori options!

Full terms and conditions on this link. TM2015 Smartphone Prize Draw

Adults, please be sure to bring original documents for identification and proof of address so we can make verified copies (child members not required to be identified, and use the adults documents who sign them in). Investment Statement available at Te Matatini or at www.whairawa.com/join.

These are needed because of legislation that affects all joining members. Or if you join up online while at Te Matatini 2015, let us know with a quick email to whairawa@ngaitahu.iwi.nz so we can put you in the draw.

(We’ll even throw in one of our Whai Rawa phone stands!)

The latest scam to hit the news involves overpriced online learning programmes. It’s been effective with some whānau because it has targeted the real desire of parents to help their children succeed in education and therefore have better chances in life.

Fortunately there are plenty of ways you can enhance the learning of your tamariki and mokopuna outside of school. In addition to the Out of School Tuition funding for registered Ngāi Tahu 8-18 year olds, there are many other free or affordable online resources to assist.

Grants & Scholarships-01First up some UK sites that are worth looking at with most activities not UK specific. Topmarks is a website with lots of free learning resources and games for various ages. Mathszone has lots of maths games worth trying.

Study Ladder is an international resource used (according to its website) by thousands of schools, in NZ and many more around the world. It gives rewards for completing learning activities that can then be used on the website to complete fun activities which works well for lots of tamariki. It can be used at home either in conjunction with school use or separately. There is a limited free use option (3 activities per day) or full paid access.

3plearning is the home of Mathletics and other well-known learning resources that allow you to track the progress of your tamariki. You can trial these for free. Subscriptions for ongoing use are normally$99 for Mathletics and $50 for Spellodrome.

If you are looking for some smartphone and tablet apps for your tamariki to play some maths games, these are some of the best although they mostly have a small cost so here’s some great free ones.

For those at secondary school there are some sites that can help. Te Kete Ipurangi is primarily a resource for schools however it does have lots of resources in both Māori and English medium including some specifically targeted towards whānau such as this one on maths. It also has links to support networks and resources for learners with different needs on its Community page. NCEA Learn Me has NCEA study guides available from $30 per subject.

Here are some other useful sites worth looking at that can help with schooling.

What can work for your whānau? Kōrero mai.

This week is Money Week and there are events all over the country for those keen to improve their financial habits.  Whether it’s a home buyers workshop in Invercargill, a webinar on financial wellbeing by Hannah McQueen, a financial health check for year 12-13’s (with a chance to win a Samsung tablet), or a free one hour financial advice phone call with a qualified financial advisor, there will be something that suits everyone so check it out now.

There’s also resources for  workplaces, communities and schools including an online Money Style quiz for 9-13 year olds.

If you can’t wait til next week you can do a financial fitness check right now online.

Meanwhile over the ditch they’ve already completed their MoneyWeek 2014 with lots of winners profiled.  One of these winners is Good Shepherd Microfinance who are also partnering organisations in NZ in providing interest-free loans for people on low incomes. One of these partnerships is a pilot with Aviva (Christchurch Women’s Refuge).

The Aussies have also produced a nifty infographic showing who is saving and for what and promoting their saving app.

rsz_1rsz_money_hand

Poua Anaru

MoneyIt’s always interesting to hear people’s stories about how they stretch their money to free up money for other priorities.  How do you stretch your money?

If you haven’t already tried an online budgeting tool there are plenty you can try such as: ANZ Money Manager or Heaps.co.nz (both free to use regardless of which bank you are with); ASB Track My Spending (you need to be an ASB customer) Westpac’s budget tool or PocketSmith (worldwide but it costs). The NZ Federation of Family Budgeting’s debt schedule and cashflow spreadsheet is a good option if you don ‘t have good internet access.

Or if you want to use an app there are lots to try.

Or if you want to try something different here are some American based tools: YouNeedABudget, Whostolemymoney.com

Meanwhile if you are in Aussie, check out the latest information at government website MoneySmart, you can try their budget planner, or some of their other great features including lots of personal finance blogs on a whole range of topics.

For more ideas on improving your finances have a look at our Money Matters section on this website

Let us know what money stretching techniques work for you.

Poua Anaru

Q markMore and more people are joining their bank KiwiSaver schemes however the Financial Markets Authority (FMA) are investigating the practices of some banks in getting customers to switch to their own KiwiSaver scheme with evidence emerging that customers were not fully informed about the switch; see also here.  The FMA are also concerned with the approach some providers are taking in offering incentives. As with any regulated financial product, the seller has to provide full details of the risks and benefits along with other details of the scheme usually in the form of an investment statement or prospectus. Remember if you feel you have been misled or missold something by a financial product provider (or anyone else!) complain to them first although it’s not always easy especially when it comes to KiwiSaver.  Remember if the bank or other provider can’t resolve the matter to your satisfaction, you can go to a free complaint resolution service –  all financial service providers in New Zealand and Australia are required to belong to one.

If you have a problem with your bank that isn’t to do with KiwiSaver or other investments, or you have an insurance problem, you can go to the Insurance and Savings Ombudsman (ISO) (after you’ve tried to solve it with the provider of course) however as we’ve been reminded with earthquake related insurance complaints, the ISO decisions are not binding and most cases you’ll be better to try and resolve it with your bank and consider switching banks.

Have you had any experience of making a complaint or resolving an issue about a financial service or product you’d like to share?

BeehiveWith recent elections in New Zealand and the independence referendum in Scotland, we’re reminded of the importance of making informed decisions about the future.  But informed decisions are difficult with so much contradictory information swirling around and sometimes we avoid even making a decision.  Maybe that’s why around 1 million adults NZers and around half of those on the Maori role didn’t vote.  Ultimately they missed out on the chance to influence the outcome of the election.

Likewise when it comes to personal finance. Making informed financial choices means you’re more likely to improve your financial situation and have more choices in life.  However it’s not easy because we are bombarded with messages about what we ‘need’; not so much about information on making good financial decisions.

To help move you and your whānau along the financial independence highway, here’s a few things you can take action on to create some healthy habits for the whanau:

We’d love your kōrero on any of these. Next week we’ll be sharing some more specific tips on a range of personal finance topics.  Let us know if there’s anything you’d like to hear more on.

Heio anō

Pōua Anaru

(editors note: Andrew Scott, aka ‘Pōua Anaru’ was the Programme Manager for Whai Rawa from 2006 – 2014 and is assisting Whai Rawa with relevant financial capability updates for Whai Rawa whānau whānui, while he is living and working in Scotland)